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Eggs turning white????
Posted by: CKWong ()
Date: January 28, 2000 10:09AM

Hello everyone. My Jack Dempsey has laid eggs 3 days ago and some of the eggs are turning white. Does that mean it's not being fertilized? How long will it take the fry to hatch? I saw the male is digging another flat place next to her nest. What does that mean? Are they preparing for some more eggs? She is eating less that before.

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RE: Eggs turning white????
Posted by: Big Ant ()
Date: January 29, 2000 05:07PM

you are right! your eggs are white because they are not fertile. its 1 or 2 things your male is not fertile or you have two females?

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RE: Eggs turning white????
Posted by: AcmeVR6 ()
Date: February 14, 2000 01:02PM



The eggs could also be white due to infection. If possible you might want to remove those white eggs if the mother has not.

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RE: Eggs turning white????
Posted by: DALE ()
Date: February 17, 2000 12:51AM

After the eggs hatch, the female will move them to the new area that the male is creating, for sanitary reasons, and safety. If you want to raise Jack Dempsey's , then I hope that you can afford quite a few aquariums to grow out the batch. No, seriouslly, be sure to give the Jack Dempseys a removeable substrate, such as a large flat slate or rock (about 5"-6" square). Place it just below the gravel level in the area that the fish seem to prefer. These fish are a substrate spawner, and will dig to the nearest hard surface, which in an aquarium is the glass bottom, if you don't provide this substrate. If they lay their eggs on the glass bottom, they are impossible to remove without damaging them. Once the eggs are deposited on a substrate that you can remove from the aquarium, remove the eggs from the parents, and put them in a clean 10-gallon bare-bottomed aquarium, filled with filtered water from the parent tank. Add enough methaline blue so that you can no longer see your hand through the aquarium. Aerate the eggs gently, and maintain a temperature of between 75 and 80 degrees for about 2 days. Then begin changing the blue water out, by making water changes with clean filtered water from the parents tank, and adding a baby saver filter (sponge type), and a bag of activated carbon, until the tank begins to get clear. Depending on temperature, you soon shall see tiny wriggling babies, in place of eggs. Now you have to start thinking about how to feed these little guys. Learn how to raise brine shrimp nupleii. If you can't hatch brine shrimp, there are some dry prepared fry foods available at your local fish store. Feed the fish as often as possible, without fouling the water. Change 25-50 percent of the water weekly, if you want maximum growth. Now you've got alot of little fish growing in a ten gallon tank. Unload as many of them as possible as fast as you can, or you are going to be known as the Jack Dempsey king of your area. Just kidding. Rearing your own batch of cichlids is a rewarding a fascinating use of your time.

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